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20120928
20121006
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party endorsed presidential candidate barack obama, republican party endorsed presidential candidate mitt romney. debate subject area, domestic policy. debate moderator, jim lara. structure, six 15-minute segment. three focus on the economy, four, five, and six health care, the role of government and governing. procedure, each candidate gets two minutes to respond to a question posed by jim lara. time remaining is given to freewheeling discussion of segments. risk factor, dangerous, sometimes lethal. ♪ [music] ♪ >> are you better off than you were four years ago? is it easier for you to go and buy things in the stores than it was four years ago? is there more or less unemployment in the country than there was four years ago? is america as respected throughout the world as it was? do you feel that our security is as safe, that we're as strong as we were four years ago? if you answer all of those questions yes, why then i think your choice is obvious as to who you'll vote for. if you don't agree, if you don't think that this course that we've been on for the last four years is what
obama won this state in 2008 by the slimmest of margins with help from a large african-american turnout. four years later in a down economy it looks like his challenge will be even greater. >> woodruff: and we talk with national public radio's greg allen. he focuses on the outreach to hispanics in the tar heel state. >> ifill: then margaret warner updates the investigation into the assault on the u.s. consulate in libya. >> woodruff: we look at new findings showing australia's great barrier reef has lost half its coral in the last 27 years. >> ifill: and we close with snapshots of three of this year's macarthur genius award winners, each with a unique view of war. >> people tend to look at the military, they tend to look at war and they tend to look at conflict as something very black and white. it's not like that at all. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: creating new enriching experiences. through intel's philosophy of "invest you for the future" we're helping bring these new capabilities to market. we're investin
would keep the bush tax cuts in place. fewer than half knew that romney and not obama had promised to increase defense spending. only 23% were aware that payroll taxes had decreased during obama's term in office. only slightly more than half knew that paul ryan is the republican vice presidential nominee. the director of the annenberg center, kathleen hall jamieson, our master media decoder is back with us. welcome. >> thank you. >> so who's responsible for the widespread unawareness or ignorance that you report in your survey? is it the candidate, the media, or the voter? >> it's all three. and fortunately, we have the opportunity with presidential debates to do something that reliably increases knowledge. we've been studying presidential debates for a long time as a scholarly community. and to our surprise, we consistently find that those who watch debates, regardless of the level of knowledge they come in with, come out with more accurate knowledge as a general group. and they do this because those who haven't paid a great deal of attention have a lot to learn. those of us who'v
candidate, president obama or mitt romney, to change the direction of the depending on who may retire in the next four years. there's no indication that anyone of them wants to retire. but you never know. >> brown: i wonder if that keeps everybody watching these cases even more carefully against that back drop. >> it always does. it will be very interesting the next four years. >> brown: marcia coyle of the national law journal, welcome back. thanks as always. >> my pleasure, jeff. woodruff: still to come on the newshour, our >> woodruff: still to come on the newshour, our campaign update with susan page and stuart rothenberg on the big debate happening wednesday; medicaid, as both sides see it; the middle class and the american dream; and documenting the worldwide oppression of women, with filmakers nicholas kristof and sheryl wudunn. but first, the other news of the day, here's kwame holman. >> holman: a suicide bomber in afghanistan killed at least 14 people today, including three american troops. the attack came as the number of u.s. deaths in the afghan war went above 2000 during
>> this is nbr. captioning sponsored by wpbt >> tom: i'm tom hudson. president obama and mitt romney are back on the campaign trail, but still debating taxes. >> susie: i'm susie gharib. the feds launch one of the largest crackdowns on medicare fraud. $430 million in scams leads to arrests from coast to coast. >> tom: and we'll introduce you to a company hoping to become the mcdonald's for healthy eaters. >> susie: that and more tonight on nbr! >> tom: it was right back to the campaign trail today for president obama and mitt romney. the president went on the attack after what's been perceived as a lackluster debate performance. and the president accused governor romney of not telling americans the truth about what president obama calls romney's $5 trillion tax plan. darren gersh, tonight, looks at what the real impact of the romney tax plan could be on the american economy. >> reporter: here's where the president gets that $5 trillion number he used again today. governor romney's plan to cut tax rates by 20% would add up to about $5 trillion over ten years, assuming no other
. >> woodruff: today at a campaign event in washington, president obama shared a message of what he called "economic patriotism" tied to a strong middle class. >> but our problems can be solved, our challenges can be met. we've still got the workers in the world, the best universities, the best scientists, the best... we got the best stuff. ( laughter ) we just got to bring it together. >> woodruff: consumer confidence is higher of late, and the president may be getting a boost from voter attitudes. an nbc news/"wall street journal" poll out last week found 42% of americans think the economy will improve in the next year. that's six points higher than a month ago. 18% say the economy will worsen, and almost a third expect it to stay the same. the obama campaign is also pointing to some revised job numbers to make its case. the u.s. bureau of labor statistics said yesterday there were nearly 400,000 more jobs created in the previous year that ended in march. that would mean that there are a higher number of jobs than when president obama took office. but the u.s. still has four million fewe
in the campaign, all eyes are on denver, where president obama and mitt romney are getting set for their first debate tonight. good evening, i'm judy woodruff. >> ifill: and i'm gwen ifill. on the "newshour" tonight, we get some pre-game analysis from mark shields and david brooks. >> woodruff: then, from loose seats to smoky cabins and labor woes, we get the latest on troubles at american airlines. >> ifill: jeffrey brown updates the story of the butler accused of stealing documents from the pope and leaking them to the press. >> woodruff: hari sreenivasan travels to the electorally important swing state of iowa where the polls opened last week. >> a recent des moines register poll found less than 2% of iowa voters were undecided, which means the campaigns could benefit from locking in votes early. >> ifill: margaret warner examines a genetic breakthrough that could allow doctors to diagnose and treat seriously ill infants sooner. >> woodruff: and we close by returning to a conversation with tonight's debate moderator, our own jim lehrer about his book on past presidential debates. that's all
obama also spoke out against iran. >> a nuclear-armed iran is not a challenge that can be contained. it would threaten the elimination of israel, the security of gulf nations, and the stability of the global economy. that is why he united states will do what we must to prevent iran from obtaining a nuclear weapon. >> woodruff: but iran's president, mahmoud ahmadinejad, has long insisted that the country's nuclear program is only for peaceful purposes. and during his own speech yesterday, he denounced potential military action by israel. >> testing new generations of ultra-modern weaponry and the pledge to disclose these armaments in due time is now being used as a new language of threat against nations to coerce them into accepting a new era of hegemony. continued threats by the uncivilized zionists to resort to military action against our great nation is a clear example of this bitter reality. >> woodruff: earlier this week, iran unveiled a new long-range reconnaissance drone and the country's revolutionary guard said it tested new missiles as well. prime minister netanyahu noted t
happy than a healthy job market. from recent college grads to president obama, their future might look more certain if companies really ramped up hiring. economists say there's too much uncertainty on the horizon for that to happen any time soon. the good news is that firms have stopped cutting jobs. the bad news is they're still too nervous to hire more than a handful of new workers. friday, economists predict the september employment report will show a modest 113,000 new positions were added, barely better than august. still, some believe current data underestimates what's really happening with hiring. >> the perception of the labor market is probably more like a world where we're adding 150,000 jobs a month, which isn't good, but certainly better than the numbers are printing which is only around 100,000 or so. >> reporter: anecdotal evidence supports that assessment too. this new york staffing firm primarily places workers in administrative jobs, and says it's finding the market surprisingly strong. today, good candidates are quickly turning temporary positions into full time jobs.
&p; it's up about a point. >> reporter: i'm darren gersh. still ahead, both mitt romney and barack obama want to put more americans back to work. but is job training the right answer? we'll take a look. >> tom: six months before the credit crunch hit full force, j.p. morgan bought failing investment bank bear stearns. that was in 2007. now, j.p. morgan faces a lawsuit, claiming it inherited massive fraud on the part of the company it purchased. the civil lawsuit alleges systemic fraud with the packaging and sale of mortgage- backed securities by bear stearns before it was taken over by j.p. morgan. the bank says it intends to fight the case. eric schneiderman is the attorney general of new york. >> eric, you represent the people of new york state. what did your citizens lose in the deals thaw are accused of being fraudulent? >> new yorkers, like people all over the united states bought shares in mortgage backed securities, pension funds invested in them. people bought homes baseed on what they thought was the realistic value of the housing market. we've learned that the housing bubble, s
have to build that into our model and say that's not going to change. so if obama gets elected they stay in. if romeny gets elected which he won't then he can't necessarily change it so let's just build that those tax cuts are gonna expire at the end of the year period. the one thing that i can tell you that is very troublesome to me as i look at prices, as i look across as i look at hog prices priced for next summer, i look at cattle prices, i look at grain prices and that is that why is it that we ignore the food and energy component of cpi? so, i could be ben bernanke's speech writer because he says the same thing every time he goes in front of the senate is we don't see any particular problem with inflation. really, we don't corn prices just nearly double in three months. so, how is it there is no inflation? >> reporter: do you get any sense that the ethanol mandate is going to change under either administration under obama or if romney would get elected? >> well is sure seems like the word ethanol has turned into a pejorative and it's not exactly the most positive topic. i
Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16 (some duplicates have been removed)

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